Is January Too Early For Blossoms?

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In the world of moleskines, the specimen Emily Chow held up was on the more sizeable and serious end of the spectrum. This was no dainty, pocket-sized edition of the iconic notebook. Emily’s moleskine meant business.

“I use these pages for writing down the things I’m dreaming about, hoping for, and planning to do,” she explained, before rotating the notebook to display its back half. “And I use the pages on this side to write down the things I’ve experienced, the things I’m grateful for. When I’ve filled so many pages on both sides that the two halves meet, I want them to reflect each other. I want the same stuff to be written on both sides. That is my commitment to myself.”

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February 6, 2015

How To Put An Actual Human Soul Into Your LinkedIn Summary

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I have an idea for a killer new app. I’m thinking of calling it ‘Impressivizer’. You load it up with all your favourite industry buzzwords and it spits out a LinkedIn summary that you can simply copy and paste to your profile. Everyone is going to use this thing! I mean, imagine: Impressivizer will shave tens of minutes from everybody’s busy schedules, tens of minutes that were previously devoted to creating LinkedIn profiles. An inhuman generator to do the work of millions of sleepy, unfocused professionals fitting in tasks in between answering emails and checking Facebook.

The Average LinkedIn Summary Is A Massive Wasted Opportunity 

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December 10, 2014

An Argument for Story-Based Communications (Part Two): Captivate the Entire Mind

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[Read Part One of this post here.] 

[Read Part Three of this post here.

Have you ever played the game where you stand face to face with a partner and the two of you try to move in perfect synch? Imagine if you could mimic your partner faultlessly in real-time, without making any conscious effort to anticipate her movements. It seems magical beyond belief, but this perfect ‘mirroring’ is exactly what occurs when we engage in storytelling.

A study lead by Princeton University’s Uri Hasson revealed that when we listen to a storyteller, the neural activity between audience and speaker becomes almost synchronous, meaning that the same areas of our brains are being activated.

Incredibly, when we are ‘really listening’ to someone, we are actually reflecting this person’s mind.

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October 2, 2014

An Argument For Story-Based Communications (Part One): Show Don’t Tell

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[Read Part Two of this post here.] 

[Read Part Three of this post here.] 

If you’ve ever taken a creative writing course, you’ve been instructed to ‘show, don’t tell.’ This same advice should apply to marketers, who are tasked with making the product or person they are presenting interesting, relevant, and memorable to potential consumers or clients. Unfortunately, marketers loooove to tell, tell, tell.

But the idea is to make a big splash with total economy, because nobody pays more than a moment’s attention to anything in this era of information-glut. And there is no more economic and elegant vehicle for capturing attention, maintaining interest, and creating memories than the good, old-fashioned well-told story.

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September 11, 2014

Ghostwrite the Person Your Client Aspires To Be

Ghostwrite the Person Your Client Aspires To Be

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August 28, 2014